Skip navigation

Category Archives: product management

HARO, or Help A Reporter Out, is a great resource for getting the message out about your product. Three times a day HARO emails a list of media opportunities, and the list recipients can choose to help out reporters in need and usually under tight deadline.

The reporters need help on stories with a variety of topics; some are personal interest, but a good many are about business as well, along with social media, recession hiring, et al. Look at each question and ask yourself how your product could impact that need, or how you could leverage the question to become a promotional effort for your brand. If the reporter uses you as a source, it will increase the long tail reach of your brand.

I am working on a new product, performing a round of competitive research to assess the market and obtain some insight into how other players are conducting pricing. It’s definitely early stages of the product; the feedback in the daily scrums is about wrapping this second iteration and prioritizing for the third. So we’re not finished conducting some key product definition decision making. And yet, we’re getting questions about finalizing the product naming. It is too early in the process; naming should be one of the last steps in the process, not the first.

Why is the Snuggie experiencing such breakthrough success? Facebook users comment on the photos of their friends, saying “where did you get that? I want one. They have them at Walgreens, etc etc”

It is a comfortable product that begs for documentation. It is not enough to own one; the ownership must be shared through shared photos, word of mouth, letting curious others try it on. It’s a bit like the product version of karaoke: once you’ve finally tried it, you have to talk about your experience with it. And this is one reason the Snuggie is such a fine product for 2009: it is an experiencial item, tailor made for inclusion into social media photo sharing.

It is outlandish, yet tame in its overall appearance. Wearers feel like they’re acting silly by wearing it, and yet it covers the entire body. So it’s safe for photo sharing.

It makes people laugh. It incites conversation with strangers, like the people I heard waiting in a checkout line, talking about the Snuggie one man was buying, how other stores were sold out, how the commercials are the new ‘i’ve fallen and I can’t get up’, what youtube versions of the commercial they’ve seen.

Snuggie’s success can be largely attibuted to word of mouth – that and that they’re mighty comfy…

Zack Gonzales